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LearningMusician Chat >> Feature Article Chat >> The Trumpet Shall Sound: Getting a Second Chance at Brass      
 
Viewing 1-6 of 6 total messages      

Michael Connolly

Offering fiddle lessons, mandolin lessons, and guitar lessons in Seattle, Washington

May 12, 2007 - 6:41 PMReply to this message
Use this thread to discuss Meg's article.

- Michael
 

Unknown User

May 14, 2007 - 1:06 PMReply to this message
I like Meg, I like her attitude and I like her article. Very inspiring.

I recommend the Scientific American article she mentioned: "The Expert Mind" from August 2006 and it's available on-line at http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa006&articleID=00010347-101C-14C1-8F9E83414B7F4945

I also recommend an article called the Effort Effect about the work of Stanford psychology professor Carol Dweck, and her book, "Mindset: The new psychology of success." The premise is beautifully demonstrated by Meg's success and joy following her persistent efforts to learn the trumpet: People who hold the limiting view that greatness in any field is primarily based on innate ability achieve less than those who believe the empowering truth that with effortful practice one can become better at most anything.
http://www.stanfordalumni.org/news/magazine/2007/marapr/features/dweck.html
 

Shulamit Kleinerman

Offering violin lessons, fiddle lessons, and viola da gamba lessons in Seattle, Washington

May 17, 2007 - 1:55 PMReply to this message
As a teacher whose studio includes several adult beginners, I really appreciated Meg's story and have recommended it to a couple of my students. I love working with adults who, more consistently than kids, *really* want to be there and know exactly what they want to get out of it.

I was also interested to consider how Meg encountered the association of particular instruments with girls or boys. I know a man who had the exact opposite experience: his parents discouraged him from the flute, so he played trumpet instead -- but switched just as soon as he left for college!

Most of all I'm curious about how much these gender associations still affect kids today. In a former child care day job, I worked with a preschool-kindergarten boy who became fascinated with my violin, watching my fingers on the strings and the bow, checking out how the pegs and tuners worked, feeling the vibrations on the body of the instrument. He would have made a fantastic student, but his dad tried very hard to steer him towards trumpet instead, and I had the impression that this was because it was a more "masculine" instrument.

I'd love to hear how other teachers handle this -- do flute teachers end up with all girls, trumpet teachers with all boys? How do you help the one or two opposite-sex kids feel less alone socially with their instrument peers? Or have things changed so that this has become less of an issue?
 

Gladys Premo

Offering piano lessons, hymn improvisation lessons, and conducting lessons in Hartsville, South Carolina

October 16, 2007 - 1:31 AMReply to this message

MEG, I absolutely enjoyed your testimony of musical imaginings about your trumpet. This goes to show that if you can believe it, you can achieve it. I've always been a dreamer, and have my own goal of penning a book about my musical endeavors, which are many. Unfortunately, my hard drive was smoked out in a housefire. But the title and the sketches are still with me. When I was in junior high years ago, our band leader's way of letting us choose, was to play a demonstration record. I fell in love with the hauntingly beautiful tone of the OBOE! My parents could not have been more horrified, but naturally acquiessed to my decision. I had to use the school's instrument (being on a pastor's salary, they could not afford the kind that Katie, first chair, had. Needless to say, I bleeped and squawked through the next two years. Years later, would you believe, at a Bible Conference Center where I played piano, I met a lovely lady who had always dreamed of becoming proficient on oboe after years of not even lifting one to her mouth. Her husband surprised her with a top of the line oboe, and her dream was fulfilled. But as for me, I am sticking with the piano, because my dreams are to play on the Oprah program, the White House Rose Garden, and to tape my patriotic medley for all of our military. Thank you for sharing your dream. May your hilltop wish become a reality! Gladys
------------------
On May 12, 2007 - 6:41 PM, Michael Connolly wrote :
> Use this thread to discuss Meg's article.
>
> - Michael
>
 

Steven Sweeney

February 14, 2008 - 12:59 PMReply to this message
I serendipitously found this inspiring article while surfing around to pick up "beginner" tips for learning to play the trumpet. At age 54, I impulsively placed an eBay bid and found myself with a student-grade trumpet this week. I played trombone in high school band -- and a little didgeradoo while living in Australia for a couple of years! -- so I knew the basics about how to get sound out of a brass instrument (other than throwing it hard against the far wall).

It's going very well already, though of course it will take a few hundred hours before I can hit the notes I want and leave out the rattles and roars and blats and hisses. I also play guitar and keyboard, so I understand the role of discipline and practice in mastering any instrument. Too, I'm a fan of the theory that you should pick a tune that has always made you say "I'd give anything to be able to play that," and set that as a goal. Having that built-in desire is more than half the way there. Obviously, there will have to be, along the way, quite a few "Mary Had a Little Lamb"s and "Row, Row, Row Your Boat"s as well.

I recently saw a live performance by the extraordinary British trumpeter Allison Balsom (http://www.allisonbalsom.com) and have been completely enchanted with her CD, "Caprice," which I cannot recommend too highly. Her sound is so beautiful, it is more like a voice. Sometimes I wait for the trumpet to "come in," and realize that she's already playing, but in tones smooth enough to mimic woodwinds. She does speak as well of the reaction to a female trumpet player, but she obviously took a stand and made a brilliant decision. "Caprice" is a beautiful collection, and as long as my CD lasts (I have extras!), it will provide much inspiration.

I hope by the end of a year to be able to sit in with a community band, if possible. No one knows I'm doing this (I live alone, albeit with a springer spaniel who is slightly confused by the strange new noises I've introduced into her heretofore peaceful surroundings), and I would get a huge kick out of surprising friends and family by showing up as part of an ensemble musical presentation. High school band was life-changing for me, and I've always wished I could get back to making music with other folks.
 

Steven Sweeney

February 14, 2008 - 1:03 PMReply to this message
Sorry, one too many "l"s in Alison's name, so that link doesn't work. Here it is again: http://www.alisonbalsom.com

------------------
On February 14, 2008 - 12:59 PM, Steven Sweeney wrote :
> I serendipitously found this inspiring article while surfing around to pick up "beginner" tips for learning to play the trumpet. At age 54, I impulsively placed an eBay bid and found myself with a student-grade trumpet this week. I played trombone in high school band -- and a little didgeradoo while living in Australia for a couple of years! -- so I knew the basics about how to get sound out of a brass instrument (other than throwing it hard against the far wall).
>
> It's going very well already, though of course it will take a few hundred hours before I can hit the notes I want and leave out the rattles and roars and blats and hisses. I also play guitar and keyboard, so I understand the role of discipline and practice in mastering any instrument. Too, I'm a fan of the theory that you should pick a tune that has always made you say "I'd give anything to be able to play that," and set that as a goal. Having that built-in desire is more than half the way there. Obviously, there will have to be, along the way, quite a few "Mary Had a Little Lamb"s and "Row, Row, Row Your Boat"s as well.
>
> I recently saw a live performance by the extraordinary British trumpeter Allison Balsom (http://www.allisonbalsom.com) and have been completely enchanted with her CD, "Caprice," which I cannot recommend too highly. Her sound is so beautiful, it is more like a voice. Sometimes I wait for the trumpet to "come in," and realize that she's already playing, but in tones smooth enough to mimic woodwinds. She does speak as well of the reaction to a female trumpet player, but she obviously took a stand and made a brilliant decision. "Caprice" is a beautiful collection, and as long as my CD lasts (I have extras!), it will provide much inspiration.
>
> I hope by the end of a year to be able to sit in with a community band, if possible. No one knows I'm doing this (I live alone, albeit with a springer spaniel who is slightly confused by the strange new noises I've introduced into her heretofore peaceful surroundings), and I would get a huge kick out of surprising friends and family by showing up as part of an ensemble musical presentation. High school band was life-changing for me, and I've always wished I could get back to making music with other folks.
 
LearningMusician Chat >> Feature Article Chat >> The Trumpet Shall Sound: Getting a Second Chance at Brass      
Viewing 1-6 of 6 total messages