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LearningMusician Chat >> General Site Chat >> Music Theory      
 
Viewing 1-6 of 6 total messages      

Joshua Hurtado

December 16, 2011 - 1:22 PMReply to this message
I had a question on my final and am nit sure if i got it right and am hoping that someone here knows the answer. The question was to find a theoretical melodic minor and then to write it out in scale form. I put e# melodic minor.
 

John Naples

Offering composition lessons, guitar lessons, and piano lessons in Carlsbad, California

January 11, 2012 - 8:15 AMReply to this message

If you want an answer you will have to post the meaning of "theoretical" melodic minor as opposed to simply melodic minor.

John
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On December 16, 2011 - 1:22 PM, Joshua Hurtado wrote :
> I had a question on my final and am nit sure if i got it right and am hoping that someone here knows the answer. The question was to find a theoretical melodic minor and then to write it out in scale form. I put e# melodic minor.
 

Joshua Hurtado

January 12, 2012 - 11:17 PMReply to this message
Theoretical meaning that the notes exists and it seems that you could put them together into a scale which you could but they are already used to form different scales. So the notes that would be used for that scale exist but the actual scale does not.

I am having some trouble trying to explain it. I am not sure if this makes sense.
 

Jon P. Nicholson

Offering piano lessons, composition lessons, and music theory lessons in Spokane, Washington

February 17, 2012 - 12:24 PMReply to this message

The term "theoretical key" sometimes refers to a key requiring double sharps (or triple, etc. sharps) or double flats. Different teachers and authors often make up their own terms but I've heard this one used more than once. If this is the correct definition in your case, the key of E# minor would be a theoretical key with a key signature of F## C# G# D# A# E# B#. For the ascending melodic minor scale, you would raise the 6th and 7th degrees to C## D## and return them to Key Signature descending. Before submitting that as your answer just be sure we are defining "theoretical key" correctly.
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On January 12, 2012 - 11:17 PM, Joshua Hurtado wrote :
> Theoretical meaning that the notes exists and it seems that you could put them together into a scale which you could but they are already used to form different scales. So the notes that would be used for that scale exist but the actual scale does not.
>
> I am having some trouble trying to explain it. I am not sure if this makes sense.
 

Jon P. Nicholson

Offering piano lessons, composition lessons, and music theory lessons in Spokane, Washington

February 18, 2012 - 10:27 PMReply to this message


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On February 17, 2012 - 12:24 PM, Jon P. Nicholson wrote :
>
> The term "theoretical key" sometimes refers to a key requiring double sharps (or triple, etc. sharps) or double flats. Different teachers and authors often make up their own terms but I've heard this one used more than once. If this is the correct definition in your case, the key of E# minor would be a theoretical key with a key signature of F## C# G# D# A# E# B#. For the ascending melodic minor scale, you would raise the 6th and 7th degrees to C## D## and return them to Key Signature descending. Before submitting that as your answer just be sure we are defining "theoretical key" correctly.
> ------------------
> On January 12, 2012 - 11:17 PM, Joshua Hurtado wrote :
> > Theoretical meaning that the notes exists and it seems that you could put them together into a scale which you could but they are already used to form different scales. So the notes that would be used for that scale exist but the actual scale does not.
> >
> > I am having some trouble trying to explain it. I am not sure if this makes sense.

You need to understand the term "enharmonic." Every key on the piano can be called more than one name. C-sharp and D-flat are the same key. C-sharp and D-flat are therefore enharmonic.

You also need to understand double-sharps and double-flats (and, theoretically, triple/quadruple/quintuple, etc sharps and flats). The D key on the piano can also be called C-double sharp or E-double flat. Also, "theoretically," every key on the piano has an infinite number of names: D can be called B-triple sharp, A-quintuple sharp, etc.

The twelve scales/keys commonly identified as enharmonic scales/keys are C-sharp major/D-flat major, F-sharp major/G-flat major, B major/C-flat major, and their relative minors. Each pair of these enharmonic scales/keys uses the same keys on the piano for their execution, but there are two different notations for each of the scale degrees. These are the only enharmonic major and minor keys that require no double sharps or double flats in the key signatures. If one allows for double sharps and double flats (and trip/quadruple/quintuple.etc sharps and flats) in the key signature, then, just as there are an infinite number of names for each key on the piano, so too are there an infinite number of enharmonic scales/keys. These are actual (even though "theoretical") scales and keys. They do exist and are available for any composer that wishes to use them.
 

Joshua Hurtado

March 7, 2012 - 8:59 PMReply to this message
That is true. I talked to my teacher and I believe she said that was correct. Although I forgot to write it in descending form. That is interesting. We just covered enharmonic tones a couple of weeks ago or so. It probably would have helped.
 
LearningMusician Chat >> General Site Chat >> Music Theory      
Viewing 1-6 of 6 total messages